RicelandMeadows


As The Soil Turns
April 24, 2019, 8:48 pm
Filed under: April 2019, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , ,

plowday42419

April 24, 2019

Almost like a soap opera, we continue to plow our old pasture. We will be planting our 2019 field corn here. The corn is used for animal feed. I am taking my time. The going is a bit slow because the horses are soft from a long winter break of not much work. I have also been delayed by our rainy weather. No matter, we will finish in time.

Today, my youngest son visited with me for a bit. He climbed on the seat for a couple of lessons. He made a few rounds. I think he realized that there is a little more going on than it looks like. He did well. The horses have been driven by him often, but not on the plow. Once he sorted things out, it went good. I’m sure a little more time in the seat is needed, before he will be confident. I just hope that I can continue to help him learn.

jakekah2019

There is not much of a better feeling, than when you are passing along knowledge. I am pleased that he wants to learn some of these old ways. I have taught butchering, woodland management, hunting, gun safety, gardening, animal husbandry and a host of other things to my children and friends. I am always thankful that I can pass what I know along to others. These things that I know are gifts from God and a whole lot of folks who could tolerate the questions from an inquisitive mind.

I encourage you dear reader, to teach a skill that you possess to another. It can be a small child, a neighbor or a dear friend, but it is a gift that keeps giving! So, the next time you want to give someone a piece of your mind, smile and give without drama, without agenda and without wondering if you’ll ever get paid back. The feeling is wonderful.



Moving Men
July 4, 2016, 3:33 pm
Filed under: July 2016 | Tags: , , , ,

Codyskidsteer

July 4, 2016

Our grandson is spending most of the summer with us. He is from Montana. He is fifteen years old. He is learning all sorts of things like animal husbandry, field and forestry management and moving round bales with the skidsteer. He moves bales, while I move a boy closer to manhood.

He will be good for me. I explain things as we do them. I forgot how many questions a young man can ask, but so far I have been able to keep up. We are accomplishing things in short order. I am looking forward to teaching him more things. We will get acquainted with the small square baler next week. He thinks it will be great fun because of some “farm app” on his phone. I will not push too hard, but let’s just say the work is much different than a game on a phone.

After that the woodshed will get filled. We will have a lot of fun with that, because we make a game of it and invite lots of friends to help. Sure we work, but we do have a frolic while doing it. The summer will fly by, much too fast, but we will have a great time. I have had the good fortune to make a positive difference in quite a few young men. I am proud of all of them!



Mentoring

MeTeach

March 21, 2016

Despite my muddy jacket, baggy pants and barn boots, I made a good teacher last week. I mentor to the local Vocational School. I teach woodlot management, environmental stewardship, and give a short maple presentation. I also give talks about small sustainable farming and the difference between community based farming -vs- commodity based farming. It is a good day for me when I can reach out to these young minds.

I have been doing this sort of thing for over five years now. I gear the talks to whatever curriculum at the time dictates.I have found that no matter how boring my presentation is…they think it beats sitting in the classroom! I figure that if I only reach one kid…it was worth it.

all about sap

I explain the process of maple syrup. I talk about how that process is somewhat complicated when working in an environmentally sensitive area such as along the banks of Mill creek. It gives me one more platform to sing praises about the low impact of my draft horses upon the land and landscape. They pull the sap sled effortlessly leaving very little sign that we were even there.

My hope is that by opening my mind and my farm to these young people, one day farm policies and public opinion will support small, even niche type, farming. These young folks are the future.  It is my hope that small farming is a part of their future too. If not farmers themselves, at least educated, informed people who buy farm products and vote.