RicelandMeadows


Welcoming in the New Year
January 3, 2020, 2:44 pm
Filed under: January 2020 | Tags: , , ,

cooler2

January 3, 2020

What a fast and furious holiday season! Happy New Year to all!

We spent part of a day butchering a beef. The new cooler is working out great. I was worried about the rail system. I wanted it to be easy to get the meat into the cooler by using our skidsteer. The new system worked out well.

We butcher the animals outside, using the skidsteer to lift up the carcasses. Once the animal chills outside a bit, we transfer them inside. The new rail system allows me to pull up close, insert a hook and roll the quarter right inside. No lifting or yanking involved.

The rail is also high enough that hogs, lambs or deer can be transferred just as easily, all in one piece. We welcome this addition to our sustainable way of life. Having a secure, cool place to hang meat until further processing takes place is wonderful. The cats may not be as happy, but we sure are!



Oh Baby
November 12, 2016, 3:31 pm
Filed under: November 2016 | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

calf

November 12, 2016

We are in our calving season. I share a Murry Gray bull with another guy. I get him for six months and my buddy keeps the bull the rest of the time. I calve in autumn because it works out for us. We have plenty of feed and a good winter home for the cows. This part of our farm operation does not compete with other jobs, so this works out perfect for us.

This little heifer calf was born Wednesday. She had a little half brother born yesterday. The weather is great. Even the sunbeam, caught in the photo above, seems to agree! The cows will soon move to their winter pasture. The babies get to run and play. They and their mommas can choose to sleep under the soft pine trees or in the three-sided shed. Most nights they stay in the pines, but when freezing rain comes, they all prefer the protection of the walls and roof.

I enjoy babies at this time of year. Spring has me hopping with maple syrup season, followed by the planting season. It is often while making hay that I would finally get to look after the calves. Now that we have switched to fall calving, I have more time to watch over them. I get to enjoy their antics as they jump and play. I can give the whole herd more attention and all of us are better off for it.

This is just one more part of our operation that we had to sort out. We need our small farm to produce in order to be sustainable. It also needs to be manageable. I think we have finally found our “groove” and Oh Baby …it’s worth it!